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ABOUT GICLEE PRINTS

Giclee (pronounced "Jee-Klay") is a French word that roughly translates to "spray fluid." Giclee prints are produced using a very expensive and sophisticated machine that operates similarly to an ink jet printer on a personal computer. A high-resolution digital image or scan of the original artwork is made, input to a computer which drives the giclee printer, and then an extensive proofing process is done until the printed image matches the original artwork, and is acceptable to the artist. Then the correct printer settings are stored digitally so that uniform and consistent giclee prints can be made in any number at any time.

The traditional lithographic printing process requires several printing plates to be made (one for each of typically four different ink colors), a lot of printer setup, and then a large run of all the prints to be done at one time, in order to control the consistency and quality of the prints, and be relatively economical and affordable. By contrast, a giclee printer requires no plates, nor special setups, other than the initial calibration and proofing to establish the correct digital settings. Uniform prints can then be made in any number at any time. This has advantages to the publisher of prints (limited inventory) and to the customer (multiple number of size combinations or output surfaces). Giclee prints of a flat artwork can be made in any size, as long as it is still dimensionally proportional to the original artwork. (Because the prints are driven by a digital image, making huge prints will eventually begin to show some visible pixellation common to all digital enlargements.)

Reputable giclee printers use archival inks, which tests show will be colorfast for a hundred years or more. Like any print, giclee prints should not be hung in direct sunlight, or where they are exposed to moisture, etc.

Giclees can be printed on paper, canvas, or even materials like metal foils. Canvas is often used for prints of paintings which were originally done on canvas, so the print resembles the texture of the original painting - sometimes astonishingly so. Giclees printed on canvas may be stretched on wooden stretcher bars (like an original painting), and then framed just like an original, or they can be mounted on a rigid board (usually a light but sturdy foamcore-type board) with an adhesive, then framed. No glass or matting is used for framed giclee prints on canvas (just like no glass is put over an oil or acrylic painting on canvas).

Giclees done on paper are framed like lithographs or photographs: matted, covered with glass, or with clear or non-glare acrylic, to protect the surface, then framed. They can also be printed on fine papers or card stock, then cut to make very nice greeting or holiday cards, etc.

If you wish to have giclee prints of any of Bill's artwork, we work directly with a couple of different local giclee printers so that we can very quickly and easily accomplish the digital capture, proofing, and calibration right on site with the printer, then make the print(s) that you want without a lot of mailing time and expense to get the proofing done before the final printing can begin.

Giclees sell for a fraction of the cost of an original drawing or painting. Prices for giclee prints of Bill's work will depend upon the actual work you wish to have printed, on the size and number of prints you want, and the surface(s) upon which you want the prints made. We'll discuss all those details with you, then be able to give you a price quote for print(s) you wish to make!


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